Tips for dealing with Adolescent Students as a New Teacher

Teaching is such a profession that seems pretty easy to do. But in the real fact, it is one of the hardest jobs that one can ever come across especially if your students tend to be Adolescents. As a New Teacher, the whole thought of standing right in front of a whole classroom full of glaring adolescents for a good 30 – 40 minutes, being judged, tried, teased and laughed upon can give anybody jitters. But, if you follow certain rules for yourself, the whole experience will be as smooth as it can ever be. You will be a Pal Teacher for your lovely adolescent students. Lets see the tips to be followed to deal with adolescent students. Remember you are a new teacher. It might be the case that your age and your students age does not have much gap. Try the tips given below for a smoother sail.

12 TIPS

1) PREPARE THE LECTURE / NOTES PRIOR

Going to the class without your weapon ready, i.e., knowledge about the subject or topic to be taught is like a suicide! Prepare and rehearse your subject well at least a day before. Any new teacher is definitely tried by its students. If you have knowledge at your fingertips, then only you can TALK to your students and engage them in your conversation with all their attention.

2) BE ON TIME

If your lecture starts at 9.00, ALWAYS be in the class a minute or two earlier. Make it a habit. It gives you as well as your students time to settle down, arrange things and save the stipulated lecture time. Also, this shows your interest in teaching the students.

3) DRESS UP ELEGANTLY

Yes the way the teacher looks also matters a lot in generating adolescent students attention and and impression about you. Your dressing and make up should always be appropriate for a classroom environment, neither too much nor too less. A clean, professional look is always welcome and gains attention as compared to the casual look of teachers.

4) NERVOUSNESS IS OK! BUT DON’T BE CLUMSY!

A little bit of nervousness is acceptable for a new teacher going to the class for the first time. But try not to SHOW your students that you are getting jitters! Be calm and composed and do not act clumsy!

5) BREAK THE ICE

Do not rush into the subject that you have to lecture about. Give yourself and your students time to get adjusted and accepted by each other. Break the ice by introducing yourself to the class first and then asking for their quick introduction.

 6) DO NOT BE BOOKISH ONLY. BE INTERESTING AND LIVELY.

They are not kids who can be fooled around by just telling them what is already given in the books. Give them situations from the real world to connect with that particular topic; cite examples from their daily lives that they find easy to understand and remember. Trust me, if you make their learning easy to remember, you are always gonna have a full strength in your class. 

Also, do not always talk about subject, topic or syllabus. At times, talk to students about topics of their interest; could be gaming, soccer, personal issues, peer pressure, personality development, grooming, hygiene or whatever. This will help you gain from their points as well as will be helpful for their overall development. 

7) BE FIRM BUT POLITE

DO NOT FORGET that your students are adolescents; this age has the maximum growing up issues mentally, physically, emotionally as well as socially. Remember your students are no more little children who could be asked to shut up with a finger on your lips, shouted upon, punished every now and then or mishandled; especially in front of their peers. Convey your message to the student firmly but in a polite way. Raising hands on them is a complete NO NO. Avoid making remarks or disclosing a students weakness in front of their peers. Keep the mentoring session after class only for that particular student and there talk out the matter. This will only make them more respecting and loving towards you. 

8) DEVELOP INTERESTING TEACHING TECHNIQUES

Now a days, there are numerous teaching learning techniques available. So, go for an interesting and engaging one like using live videos, graphic presentations, diagrams, models or at times, if possible, site visits. Students are going to love you for this.

9) NEVER GIVE FALSE INFO OR SHOOT IN THE DARK

If you get stuck in a situation where you have no answer for a question of your student, do not try your luck by giving out wrong or false information and making him / her believe. We are humans and we make mistakes. Politely tell the student that you do not have the correct answer to this question at the moment and you will get back to him with the correct information soon and do what you say… DO GET BACK SOON! 

10) NEVER STRETCH YOUR LECTURE

You came on time, kindly leave on time. After a good 30 – 40 minutes lecture, human mind gets tired. Try finishing off your topic 5 – 10 minutes prior to the next lecture. It gives you time to properly wind off  and gather your stuff and the students get time to ask questions, and clear doubts, if they have any; else they will just get some time to relax their minds and be prepared for the next class.

11) BE APPROACHABLE AFTER CLASS

This is no school. You should be approachable to your students so that they can come to you with their problems with ease as some of them might be shy asking questions in front of the whole class. 

12) THANK YOUR CLASS

Yes, it might sound silly to some, but it is one important factor that helps you connect with your students more. 

Following the above tips have helped me out in my journey as a teacher to college students and I always cherish the memories of my amazing students. Hope it will benefit you too.

Happy Teaching 🙂

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One Response to Tips for dealing with Adolescent Students as a New Teacher

  1. vasiddiqui says:

    Very informative and full of practical beings faced by a new teacher. Very nice.

    Like

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